Tag Archives: translation

Sherrie Levine

Sherrie Levine African Masks After Walker Evans- 1-24, 2014 Image 16

Sherrie Levine African Masks After Walker Evans- 1-24, 2014 Image 1

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Sherrie Levine, ‘African Masks after Walker Evans’ (2015)

In 1979, Sherrie Levine received widespread acclaim for her series ‘After Walker Evans’, in which she re-photographed 24 of Walker Evans’s photographs out of an exhibition catalogue, depicting the impoverished rural population in Alabama at the end of the 1920s. 35 years later, in a further series after Walker Evans, Levine addresses similar issues with new layers of relevance.

For the series ‘African Masks after Walker Evans’, the artist chose her motifs from an extensive collection of over 400 photographs of African artworks that Walker Evans was commissioned to produce in 1935 by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Evans photographed numerous objects from “African Negro Art,” a major exhibition shown in 1935 at the Museum of Modern Art and other American museums. These photographs were not used for the exhibition catalogue, but were compiled into a portfolio of more than 400 original prints, provided to museums and specialized libraries for educational purposes. This comprehensive project made a significant contribution to the reception of African art in the western aesthetic canon.

Selecting only masks for her series, Sherrie Levine hones in on the question of the identity of the artwork creator. Walker Evans’s photographs already indicate the aesthetic primacy of the works he depicted: through the act of being photographed, they are transformed in status from foreign ritual artifacts into modern sculptures.

Ana Navas




Ana Navas, ‘Yet far more often than these text based pieces, one would play pure melodies on the mouth organ (version II)’ (2013)

Based on descriptions of audio guides from ethnographic museums, 10 objects are created out of paper napkins. The originals remain unseen; the reconstruction relies only on the information heard.

Christian Marclay



Christian Marclay, ‘Mixed Reviews (American Sign LAnguage)’ (2006)

This video takes writing about music as its theme, and depicts American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter Jonathan Kovacs signing a long, collaged text made by Marclay from reviews of musical performances and records.

Avery Singer


Avery Singer, ‘The Studio Visit’ (2012)

Sharon Hayes

Sharon Hayes_My Memory Translates Everything into Something Else

Sharon Hayes, ‘My Memory Translates Everything into Something Else’.

Cecilie Bjørgås Jordheim

Screen shot 2013-02-05 at 10.45.35


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Cecilie Bjørgås Jordheim, ‘POLARSTAR’ (2009)

‘And it curled up and broke on the shore’, editing table, 16mm film loop and EKG;  Still Image from loop on the editing table screen.

Jess Dobkin


Jess Dobkin, ‘Ear piece’ (2007)

The artist’s ear pokes through a gallery wall. She communincates with the audience by writing notes which are projected onto the opposite gallery wall.

John Cage

cage- where r is ryoanji

John Cage, ‘Where R = Ryoanji (3R/17)’ (1992)

Cerith Wyn Evans

Cerith Wyn Evans, ‘Chandeliers’ (2003)

The ‘Chandelier’ sculptures evoke notions of otherworldly communication by using sections of texts that have been translated into the flashing light signals of Morse Code, such as “Diary: How to improve the world (you will only make matters worse)” continued 1968 from ‘M’ writings ’67-’72 by John Cage.


Diana Duta

Diana Duta, ‘Keeping time’ (2010)

Diana Duta translated the lyrics of Romanian pop-songs from her birthyear to phonetic English. These lyrics were sung by her (non-Romanian) friends and recorded to tape with Duta playing drums in the background. During the exhibition ‘If you say something, see something’ at Tent., Rotterdam, she asked employees of the space to wear T-shirts she had silkscreened with the lyrics.

Check the edit she made of the recordings here.