Tag Archives: installation


Maria Loboda

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Maria Loboda, ‘Ah, Wilderness’ (2013)

branches of cedar, pine, birch, tress which that would naturally edge each other out in a forest


Robert Irwin

Robert_Irwin_Untitled_1967_68_1588_88 Robert Irwin, ‘Untitled (disc installation)’ (1967-68) A short essay about the artist : Seeing is forgetting the name of the thing one sees, by Lawrence Weschler


Jak Peters

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Projectors by Jak Peters, as presented at galerie Gallery in 2009.


Mary Miss

Mary Miss. Perimeters_Pavillions_Decoys. 1978-2

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Mary Miss, several impressions of the exhibition ‘Perimeters / Pavillions / Decoys’ (1978)

Short PDF on the work here.


Robert Smithson

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Robert Smithson, ‘Rocks and mirror square III’ (1971)


Tonio de Roover

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Tonio de Roover, ‘Green object’ (2007)


Maurice Bogaert

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‘No Overview’ (fragment) (2014) by Maurice Bogaert.

No Overview shows a series of works made over the last three years. The different works merge into one large scale installation.


William Leavitt

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William Leavitt, ‘Arctic Earth’ (2014)


Leon Vranken

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Leon Vranken at Z33, Hasselt (2014).


Kamikaze Loggia

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Photograph by Levan Asabashvili.

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Photograph by Krzysztof Weglel.

Some examples of informal structures called “kamikaze loggias”, the vernacular extensions of modernist buildings characteristic of Tbilisi. These extensions have been created since the 1990s as an organic response to the new, “lawless” times after the fall of the Soviet Union. They increase the living space and are usually used as terraces, extra rooms, open refrigerators, etc.

It is said that a Russian journalist named them “kamikaze”, drawing a parallel between the romantic and suicidal character of such an endeavour and the typical ending of most Georgian family names “-adze”. This architecture also refers back to the local palimpsestic building technique, which since the Middle Ages has allowed new houses to be built on top of existing ones on the steep slopes of the Caucasus Mountains thus not monumentalising the past but expanding on it for the future.

Read more about the Georgian Pavillion at the 2013 Venice Architecture Biennale here.