Tag Archives: wall


Robert Irwin

Robert_Irwin_Untitled_1967_68_1588_88 Robert Irwin, ‘Untitled (disc installation)’ (1967-68) A short essay about the artist : Seeing is forgetting the name of the thing one sees, by Lawrence Weschler


Ger van Elk

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Ger van Elk, ‘Los Angeles freeway flyer’ (1973)

Contact prints wrapped around six walking sticks.


Michel Francois

Galerie CarlierGebauer

Galerie CarlierGebauer

Michel François, ‘Stumbling block’ (1989-2013)


Jacob Dahlgren

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Jacob Dahlgren, ‘Reykavik 1952′ (2009)

Cloth hangers and aluminium


Tonio de Roover

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Tonio de Roover, ‘Green object’ (2007)


Maurice Bogaert

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‘No Overview’ (fragment) (2014) by Maurice Bogaert.

No Overview shows a series of works made over the last three years. The different works merge into one large scale installation.


William Leavitt

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William Leavitt, ‘Arctic Earth’ (2014)


Unknown

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Leon Vranken

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Leon Vranken at Z33, Hasselt (2014).


Kamikaze Loggia

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Photograph by Levan Asabashvili.

kamikaze loggia krzysztof weglel

Photograph by Krzysztof Weglel.

Some examples of informal structures called “kamikaze loggias”, the vernacular extensions of modernist buildings characteristic of Tbilisi. These extensions have been created since the 1990s as an organic response to the new, “lawless” times after the fall of the Soviet Union. They increase the living space and are usually used as terraces, extra rooms, open refrigerators, etc.

It is said that a Russian journalist named them “kamikaze”, drawing a parallel between the romantic and suicidal character of such an endeavour and the typical ending of most Georgian family names “-adze”. This architecture also refers back to the local palimpsestic building technique, which since the Middle Ages has allowed new houses to be built on top of existing ones on the steep slopes of the Caucasus Mountains thus not monumentalising the past but expanding on it for the future.

Read more about the Georgian Pavillion at the 2013 Venice Architecture Biennale here.