Luis Camnitzer

Luis-Camnitzer-the discovery of geometry-1978

Luis Camnitzer, ‘The discovery of geometry’ (1978)


Mary Jacobus

“Hubert Damisch’s study, A Theory of /Cloud/ (1972), makes /cloud/ the sign of painting’s paradoxical combination of the ephemeral and the material. Above all, it signals the escape of painting from the dominance of perspective and its historical transformation; the problem of surface became the problem of illusion. By the use of two forward slashes, Damisch transforms /cloud / into an index or signifier, rather than a word denoting “cloud” in any descriptive or figurative sense. Enslaved to linear perspective (so Damisch argues), painting seeks another way of representing visual experience. /Cloud/, whether rendered as the absence of sky or as deceptive trompe l’oeil, poses an alternative to the linear order. It becomes a sign of all that painting has to overcome. Instead of organizing the limits of a flat surface, the illusionistic clouds of the painted baroque cupola overflow their architectural frame. Correggio, according to Damisch, was the first to construct his pictures from the point of view of a Kantian subject for whom space is a constitutive aspect of consciousness.

Damisch’s semiotic analysis of pictorial production takes the theme and texture of /cloud/ as an indexical case-study for the development of painting, making /cloud/ the defining problematic of painting from the baroque to the present day. This “pictorial” or “painterly” space – what he calls “a free and unlimited depth, considered as a luminous and aerial substance” – is opposed to a modernist emphasis on linear style, with its flatness and overlapping forms. /Cloud/ is the sign of the volume repressed by modern painting’s fixation on the flatness of the representational surface. Its semiotics challenge the insistence of twentieth-century modernism on the representation of painterly space. Clouds round out pictorial space instead of flattening it; they point to the organization of the pictorial as a dialectic of surface and depth. /Cloud/ negates solidity and shape. Nebulous and indefinite, it signals an indeterminate volume, defying the medium and restoring painting to the realm of illusion. But /cloud/ also contains the paradox of form which signifies itself.”

From: ‘Cloud Studies: The Visible Invisible’, by Mary Jacobus


John Constable

Constable_Study of clouds at Hampstead-1821

John Constable, ‘Study of clouds at Hampstead’ (1821)


Claude Monet

monet-gare-lazare

‘The Gare St-Lazare’ (1877), by Claude Monet.


Frederick Childe Hassam

Childe Hassam-avenue of the allies great britain 1918-1918

‘Avenue of the Allies, Great Britain’ (1918) by Childe Hassam


Remco Torenbosch

Remco Torenbosch EU Research 02

Prix de Rome exhibition at De Appel in Amsterdam of Remco Torenbosch. Starting 25 october 2013. Other contestants: Christian Friedrich, Falke Pisano, Ola Vasiljeva//Naamsvermelding fotograaf is verplicht/ Photographer's name must be stated at all times.

Remco Torenbosch EU, 2011-2014-1

Remco Torenbosch, ‘EU’ (2011-2014)

An investigation into the history and production of the blue flag of the European Union designed by Arsène Heitz and Paul Lèvy in 1955. The presentation shows a collection of textile fabrics made in the European blue color code by the still existing weaving mills in the European Union. Although the color code for the EU flags is mandated, because of the differing production processes in each country and at each mill, it can still vary, resulting in a wide diversity of blue tints, as seen in this collection.


AMO

The-Barcode-A-European-Flag-proposal-by-AMO

‘The Barcode’, a proposal for a European flag, by AMO, the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)’s research studio.


John Körmeling

breeedewegschets

‘Socialized Road’ by John Körmeling.


Theo van Doesburg

Theo van Doesburg. Eine Stadt fur den Verkehr, 1929

Theo van Doesburg, ‘Eine Stadt für den Verkehr’ (one city for traffic) (1929)


Rem Koolhaas

Rem Koolhaas, Drawing of Dreamland, 1977

Rem Koolhaas, ‘Drawing of Dreamland’ (1977)